InquiryInquiry(version: 716)
In the summer semester of the academic year 2023/2024, data collection is allowed from 27.05.2024 until 15.09.2024. (MFF)
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Suggestions to education (Both semesters)
  
Course: Department:
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When the course guarantor is selected, comments will be displayed regarding his/her teaching performance as well as that of all the other teachers teaching the course. If a teacher who is not the course guarantor is selected, only comments related to his/her teaching will be displayed.
Mgr. Burak Aygun [32-KG], Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, cvičení]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 12.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
Skvely vyucujici. Latku nam vzdy dobre vysvetlil.
doc. RNDr. Marie Běhounková, Ph.D. [32-KG], Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, přednáška]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 18.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
Additional notes to the overall rating:
Even though all of us were sitting in the first rows, sometimes, it was hard to hear the lecturer. So, maybe try to shout the information more loudly.
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 09.01.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
I’m sorry to say this, but I was not able to pay attention at the lectures. The slides were abstract for me and I couldn’t orient in all the equations.
RNDr. Tomáš Kekule, Ph.D. [32-KVOF], Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, přednáška]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 18.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
There are not many things to comment. The demonstrations were nice and clear. :)
RNDr. Petr Král [32-KFKL], Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, cvičení]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 18.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
Dr. Král was almost always well-prepared.
Also, the approach to students was good. Dr. Král tried to help whenever a student was unsure of the formula or made a mistake. However, he was sometimes way too chaotic, especially in contrast to Burak Aygun, who filled in for Dr. Král once.
doc. RNDr. Jiří Prchal, Ph.D. [32-KFKL], Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, přednáška]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 18.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
Additional notes to the overall rating:
I really like the enthusiasm of the lecturer.

And I have one more note on the slides. Doc. Prchal's slides are also a bit chaotic. There are often many illustrations, photos, and equations on one slide. Perhaps it could be beneficial in some cases to divide one slide into more or somehow graphically separate sections of one slide.
Comment on course, Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, cvičení]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 12.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
Napln cviceni odpovidala přednasce, testum, i zkousce. Predmet byl zajimavy.
Comment on course, Principles of Physics I – General Physics and Classical Mechanics [NFPL028, přednáška]
Student has disallowed display of personal data, 18.02.2024, 1. ročník, Science, Bachelor's
For the whole semester, I thought the physics lectures were unnecessarily complicated (crowded with integrals and a too-large number of new concepts). However, during the examination period, when I thoroughly reviewed the material, I got the idea that the problem might not have been in the content but in the form of introducing it.

I have spoken with several other students (who also got a grade of 1 on the exam), and we agreed that none of us was actually able to stay on for the whole course of the lecture (especially during doc. Běhounková's lectures). I tried to identify where the problem lies – and, in my opinion, the troublemaker is the slides.

Once a lecturer is going fast through a slide with several equations and formulas (god forbid, derivation of specific equations), students get lost very easily. Thus, I would suggest returning to chalk and blackboard, which means the lecturer would be going through the same thought process as the students. Whether one wants to or not, when giving a lecture with slides, he tends to skip some seemingly obvious steps at which the audience gets stuck, and a lecturer unintentionally escapes to other topics. Thus, creating the content de novo (by writing the things on the blackboard) during the lecture seems to be the best way to arouse understanding.

By the way, what I find a great way to improve a course is a comparison with similar courses all over the top world universities. Once we want to be able to compete with analogous study programmes, we have to know what their teaching looks like. For example, Physics 1a at Caltech seems easily accessible (http://www.its.caltech.edu/~ph1a/lectures.htm), and I doubt it would be enormously complicated to find material from other universities.

One thing that made the course a little less beautiful was the language. It was not uncommon that there were mistakes in the lectures (e.g. confusion of the words table and blackboard, atypical pronunciation of the terms such as inertia), and a bit of a howler at the end was the recommendation of coming ”well studied, enough slept and eaten” to the exam. But I think the practice (and maybe a university language course) would improve that.

Nonetheless, I very much appreciate the approach to the students. The lecturers, for example, decided to come 30 minutes before the lecture, ready to answer questions concerning concepts mentioned previously. Lecturers also shared slides in advance and later provided students with a hard copy. (But I think that would not be necessary once the lecturers start using the blackboard. Then, the students would have time to grasp the concepts and to note everything down.)

Lecturers communicated the requirements clearly and in advance. And there was also an effort to create ”promo videos“ – however, I do not know whether it found use and if students were watching that.

I emphasize access to the examples of the Wednesday exercises held by Burak Aygun, especially in contrast to ours, since we had not gotten the results of calculated examples. I do not find the explanation that students in the following years would not be coming to the exercises very valid. The exercise is, by the way, the only part of the first-semester curriculum with compulsory attendance.

And by the way, SIS mentions recording lectures. For example, at Cambridge, all these lectures are recorded every year. So the students have access to up-to-date recordings even with fever and bad cough, or once they want to revise the lecture and go through the topics they have misunderstood previously. And if I am not mistaken, even some lecturers at Charles University record each of their lectures each year. So, would that not work even for this course?
 
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